Australian biodiversity needs more protection after the fires

Protecting Australian biodiversity after the fires

The 2019/2020 bushfires were catastrophic for Australia’s already fragile and under-protected wildlife. Recent reports indicate that more than three billion native animals were killed or harmed by the fires.

Scientists have identified 119 species that require immediate help and the ongoing fallout of the fires is threatening Australian biodiversity. In addition to ongoing recovery efforts, we need better policies, environmental laws, and climate action to ensure the survival of Australia’s unique wildlife.

Counteracting the long-term fallout for survivors

The 2019/2020 fires were worse than usual because of the occurrence of megafires in dense forests. These megafires did not leave as many unburnt areas as is the case with smaller bushfires. This means that those animals that did manage to escape the blaze have lost critical habitat and food sources. While supplementing food and water can provide some relief, re-introducing native plants will be necessary to ensure animals can survive.

Ideas
Australian bushfire crisis Kangaroo Island

Australian bushfire crisis: how you can help long-term

The past months have been incredibly tough. Australia is fighting an unprecedented bushfire crisis which has burned across an area of at least 10.7 million hectares. Over 1,700 homes have been destroyed and 23 people lost their lives.

Over 1 billion animals are estimated to have died in a country where over 1,800 native plant and animal species had already been at risk of extinction. Conservationists fear that we may have lost some of them forever. Meanwhile, the bushfires are still burning across vast areas with no real end in sight.

Each day seems to bring more bad news. And while there are countless stories of incredible generosity and community, it’s still hard not to feel overwhelmed and helpless at times. Donating to causes that provide immediate support and relief is fantastic and vital, but I have spoken to many people who still felt they were not doing enough.

Managing the emergency right now still must be the priority. Yet the reality is that we will have to deal with the fallout from the current fires for many years to come – long after the haunting images will have disappeared from our newsfeed. This blog posts provides some ideas on how you can help long-term.

It’s by no means an exhaustive list, but I will keep adding to it over time. If you have any other ideas on how to get involved, please add them in the comments below or drop me a line for it to be added to the main article.

Donate your skills to those affected by the Australian bushfire crisis

You might not have the money to support the relief efforts financially, but you might have the time and skills to help where it’s needed the most. What’s more, lending an active hand to bushfire victims will feel a lot more productive than continuously refreshing your social media feed.

Conservationist